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Meghan Staudt

Meghan Staudt

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resolutions market ResearchWe are now officially two months into 2017, which means it’s time to keep up with those New Year’s resolution goals. Resolutions can be difficult to attain in both personal and professional life settings. Recently, I stumbled upon an article by Crawford Hollingworth, an interesting read about behavioral science and its effect on New Year’s resolution goal attainment. As I was reading the article, I realized the suggestions for preparing resolution goals provided in the article also relate to the process of preparing a market research study. The four steps for developing a New Year’s resolution recommended in the article are: Make a plan, Substitute old behavior for new behavior, Make it easy, and Make only one New Year’s resolution. My view on how these strategies relate to market research is as follows:


1. Make a plan

The first step of the market research journey is to make an action plan. Figure out what the objective of your research is going to be – what do you want to know and from who do you want insight? Next, consider the methods through which you will obtain the most meaningful and useful results for your research objective. Finally, put together a schedule that includes every aspect of the research, including questionnaire design, fielding the survey, data delivery and reporting the research findings.


2. Substitute old behavior for new behavior

In the grand scheme of market research methodologies, there are plenty of approaches to choose from that will provide the results needed to make powerful decisions about your product or service. Of course, it is normal human behavior to have the desire to stick to what you know, and market research isn’t much different. However, methodologies are continuing to evolve and can provide findings in various ways. For example, TRC has developed methodologies such as Message Test Express™, Idea Mill™ and Bracket™, along with other solutions that are increasingly popular among the research we conduct. This is an opportunity to be creative and try methodologies that have been tested and offer proven results, which will allow you to view research findings from an alternative perspective.


3. Make it easy

In order to get reliable results from your research, it is best to start with consideration of the questionnaire design. Plan the design with the end in mind first, then work your way to the front; if you consider what you want to know first, the questions themselves will come together easily. This will allow you to easily interpret and analyze data during the final reporting stages. On the other hand, in terms of the actual survey, you want to avoid developing questions that are overly complicated or time consuming for respondents. Make sure the questions asked make sense and the instructions are clear and concise so that respondents can quickly grasp the idea of what you are asking of them.


4. Make only one New Year’s resolution

A colleague of mine, Rajan Sambandam, provided insight during a recent meeting about the scope of market research studies being “Broad and Shallow” versus “Narrow and Deep” that I found to be interesting. A take-away from his statement is that you should either have a broad and shallow scope through which you will have less informative findings about a larger group of topics, or a narrow and deep scope through which you will have an abundance of detailed findings about one topic. Instead of striving to accomplish both “broad and shallow” and “narrow and deep” research in one initiative, focusing on one or the other will provide the most meaningful and useful information to be applied to your product or service.

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wawa app market research surveyAbout a decade ago, if someone would have mentioned the words "mobile app", anyone would have looked at them with a very puzzled expression. Nowadays, we hear about these apps everywhere. There are commercials for them on television, ads in magazines, billboard posts, etc. It's truly amazing to see how advanced technology has become and what can be accomplished by using it.

In this technology-based era, the smartphone is becoming increasingly popular among a wide variety of ages. In my opinion, the biggest perk of smartphones is that we almost always have access to the Internet. Being that the Internet is one of the most efficient tools that retailers and businesses use to create, retain, and obtain business, why wouldn't they capitalize on the popularity and functionality of smartphones and use it to their advantage to do even more creating, obtaining and refining of their business? One of the best ways for a company to remain competitive in this smartphone era is to create a mobile app specific to the company.

Take Wawa for example. For those who are not on the East coast and may be unfamiliar with Wawa, it is a wonderful place that offers gasoline, freshly prepared foods, snacks, coffee and more. Okay, yes, ultimately it's a convenience store/gas station. However, to many of us on the East coast, it's much more. Anyway, if you download the Wawa app, you can link it up with your credit card or a Wawa gift card, which means you don't even have to bring your wallet into the store. The app includes a rewards system, in which you receive points for your purchases, which can be used to receive a free coffee or tea, or something of similar value. While Wawa offers many benefits to its customers through its mobile app, such as locating a nearby Wawa, checking gasoline prices or having easy access to nutrition info, it also gives app users the chance to provide feedback by means of an open-end suggestion form. It would benefit the company to implement a survey within the app instead of an open-end feedback form to gain insights about customers' transactions, experiences, and their overall opinions.

Fielding surveys within mobile apps provides a quick and easy way to reach customers and gain useful feedback. So, how do you get app users to actually participate in the survey? Simple. When the app is first opened or closed, add a pop-up message with a link to the survey that encourages the user to take the survey. Also, go ahead and add the survey as an item on the app's navigation menu. While it's not ideal to conduct surveys on mobile devices that contain something as intricate as conjoint analysis, companies can still create a simple survey that can be used to gain valuable insights about current products, potential products, customer satisfaction and an abundance of other consumer-related topics.

In order to create the best experience for the app user and get the most out of the data that is collected, companies should consider these five tips when developing a mobile survey:

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I begin every weekday by driving through a toll plaza on the Pennsylvania Turnpike to get to work. By this time, I haven’t usually had my morning cup of coffee yet; therefore, my mathematical skills are probably not always up to par. So, I take the easy way out and use my E-ZPass, which saves me the daily burden of counting out change to make my way through the toll booth.

Overall, the E-ZPass system seems relatively straightforward. You use a credit card to open an account and you receive an electronic tag, or transponder, that has your personal billing and vehicle information embedded into it. You put the transponder somewhere on the dashboard or windshield of your vehicle, which then sends a signal to a receiver as you drive through the toll booth that detects your tag, registers your information and charges your account accordingly. When all is said and done, you see the polite green light that says “Thank You” (unless you have a low balance, of course) and you are on your merry way. Quick and simple, right?

Before I began working in market research, I wouldn’t have thought much more about the E-ZPass system other than it gets me to where I need to go quickly. Now that I’m almost a year into my market research career with more of a research-oriented point of view, I got to wondering a little more in depth about the E-ZPass system and how the company conducted its research within the toll-user market to find out if its new toll system would prosper. After a little research, I found that the company used the ever-reliable conjoint analysis method of research.

The scholarly article, Thirty Years of Conjoint Analysis: Reflections and Prospects by Paul Green, Abba Kreiger and Yoram Wind, discusses the use of conjoint analysis in an abundance of studies throughout the past 30 years. One of the studies that this article focuses on is the research done prior to the development and implementation of the E-ZPass system. E-ZPass has been in the works for about 12 years now; the company began its market research in 1992. Two states, New Jersey and New York, had conducted conjoint analysis research using a sample size of about 3,000 to decipher the potential of the system. There were seven attributes used in this conjoint study, such as number of lanes available, tag acquisition, cost, toll prices, invoicing and other potential uses of the transponder. Once the respondents’ data was collected, it was analyzed in total and by region and facility. The study yielded an estimated 49% usage rate, while the actual usage rate seven years later was a close 44%. While both percentages were not extremely high, the company estimated the usage rate would continue to increase in the future.

Green, Kreiger and Wind make a fair point in their article when they say that conjoint analysis has the ability “to lead to actionable findings that provide customer-driven design features and consumer-usage or sales forecasts”. This study serves as a great example to support this statement just by looking at how close the projected usage rate from the data collected ended up being to the actual usage rate. An abundance of the studies that we execute here at TRC use conjoint analysis because of its dependable predictive nature. Whether clients are looking to enter a new product or service into the market, or are looking to improve upon an already existing product or service, conjoint analysis provides them with direction for a successful plan.

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