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In today’s fast paced, high stakes business environment, where budgets are tighter than ever, finding the time and dedicating the resources needed for generating breakthrough product ideas can be very challenging. Many companies we’ve worked with either have no process in place or rely on internal brainstorming to come up with their next product ideas.

As we know, brainstorming sessions often include a variety of stakeholders. Our academic colleague, Jacob Goldenberg, points out in his book “Inside the Box,” that a better approach to coming up with new ideas is to brainstorm on your own independently, and then bring ideas to the drawing board anonymously for further discussion and feedback. 
 
In addition, while ideation brainstorming sessions often draw upon a wealth of information and trends accumulated via various types of past research, it is difficult to come up with product ideas that are truly new. Thus, most efforts result in close-in modifications or adaptations to existing offers.
 
However, there are some key advantages to such a process as well. Likely, the most important of those is early stakeholder engagement. Having the team onboard early and throughout the process certainly increases your odds of success, and those odds increase even more when consumers are also included early in the process.
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Maria Panizo
    Maria Panizo says #
    Liked your webinar very much. To collect consumer feedback what would you say are the most efficient ways of doing it?
  • Kevin Dona
    Kevin Dona says #
    I am glad that you liked the webinar! The most efficient way somewhat depends on how you define “efficient” and the end purpose o

An issue that comes up quite a bit when doing research is the proper way to frame questions. In my last blog I reported on our Super Bowl ad test in which we surveyed viewers to rank 36 ads based on their “entertainment value”. We did a second survey that framed the question differently to see if we could determine which ads were most effective at driving consideration of the product…in other words, the ads that did what ads are supposed to do!

As with life, framing, or context, is critical in research. First off, the nature of questions is important. Where possible the use of choice questions will work better than say rating scales. The reason is that consumers are used to making choices...ratings are more abstract. Techniques like Max-Diff, Conjoint (typically Discrete Choice these days) or our own proprietary new product research technique Bracket™ get at what is important in a way that ratings can’t.

Second, the environment you create when asking the question must seek to put consumers in the same mindset they would be in when they make decisions in real life. For example, if you are testing slogans for the outside of a direct mail envelope, you should show the slogans on an envelope rather than just in text form.

Finally, you need to frame the question in a way that matches the real world result you want. In the case of a direct mail piece, you should frame the question along the lines of “which of these would you most likely open?” rather than “which of these slogans is most important?”. In the case of a Super Bowl ad (or any ad for that matter), asking about entertainment value is less important than asking about things like “consideration” or even “likelihood to tell others about it”.  

So, we polled a second group of people and asked them “which one made you most interested in considering the product as advertised?” The results were quite interesting.

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  • Dave
    Dave says #
    The consideration vs entertainment angle is an interesting take.

Budweiser puppyWell, it is the time of year when America’s greatest sporting event takes place. I speak of course about the race to determine which Super Bowl ad is the best. Over the years there have been many ways to accomplish this, but like so often happens in research today, the methods are flawed.

First there is the “party consensus method”. Here people gathered to watch the big game call out their approval or disapproval of various ads. Beyond the fact that the “sample” is clearly not representative, this method has other flaws. At the party I was at we had a Nationwide agent, so criticism of the “dead kid” ad was muted. This is just one example of how people in the group can influence each other (anyone who has watched a focus group has seen this in action). The most popular ad was the Fiat ad with the Viagra pill…not because it was perhaps the favorite, but because parties are noisy and this ad was largely a silent picture.

Second, there is the “opinion leaders” method. The folks who have a platform to spout their opinion (be it TV, YouTube, Twitter or Facebook) tell us what to think. While certainly this will influence opinions, I don’t think tallying up their opinions really gets at the truth. They might be right some of the time, but listening to them is like going with your gut…likely you are missing something.

Third, there is the “focus group” approach. In this method a group of typical people is shuffled off to a room to watch the game and turn dials to rate the commercials they see.   So, like any focus group, these “typical” people are of course atypical.   In exchange for some money they were willing to spend four hours watching the game with perfect strangers.   Further, are focus groups really the way to measure something like which is best? Focus groups can be outstanding at drawing out ideas, providing rich understandings of products and so on, but they are not (nor are they intended to be) quantitative measures.

The use of imperfect means to measure quantitative problems is not unique to Super Bowl ads. I’ve been told by many clients that budget and timing concerns require that they answer some quantitative questions with the opinions of their internal team, or their own gut or qualitative research. That is why we developed our agile and rigorous tools, including Message Test Express™ (MTE™).

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