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Consumer Behavior

recycle market research pricingIn my two previous blogs about recycling, I reported on gender gaps in recycling behavior and general knowledge about what is curbside-recyclable and what isn't.

Now we turn to the real question: why aren't consumers recycling on a more consistent basis? Again we turned to our online consumer research panel and asked those with curbside recycling access who don't recycle regularly a simple question: Why not? What behaviors and attitudes can Recyclers act upon to educate their customers and encourage more recycling?

Well, like any complex problem, there's no one single answer. Lack of knowledge of what's recyclable and being unsure how to get questions answered play a big part (28%). Recyclers can raise awareness through careful and consistent messaging.

But just as significant as knowledge is overcoming basic laziness (29%). Sorting your recycling from your trash takes effort, and not everyone is willing to expend energy to do so. Recyclers may not be able to motivate them, but another concern is addressable, and that's scheduling – having trash and recycling pick-up on different days can de-motivate consumers to recycle (15%).

Another challenge is forgetfulness. Some folks are willing to recycle, but it slips their mind to do so (25%).
Education could help promote a feeling of responsibility and elevate recycling's importance:


•  I don't feel that whether or not I recycle makes a difference (14%)
•  Recycling isn't important to me (10%)
•  I'm not convinced recycling helps the environment (8%)

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pollsters-went-wrongThe surprising result of the election has lots of people questioning the validity of polls…how could they have so consistently predicted a Clinton victory? Further, if the polls were wrong, how can we trust survey research to answer business questions? Ultimately even sophisticated techniques like discrete choice conjoint or max-diff rely upon these data so this is not an insignificant question. 

 
As someone whose firm conducts thousands and thousands of surveys annually, I thought it made sense to offer my perspective. So here are five reasons that I think the polls were “wrong” and how I think that problem could impact our work.

 

 

5 Reasons Why the Polls Went 'Wrong'


1) People Don’t Know How to Read Results
Most polls had the race in the 2-5% range and the final tally had it nearly dead even (Secretary Clinton winning the popular vote by a slight margin). At the low end, this range is within the margin of error. At the high end, it is not far outside of it. Thus, even if everything else were perfect, we would expect that the election might well have been very close.  

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Recycling market researchIn my previous blog, we determined that people with access to recycling services don’t necessarily recycle. And men were far less likely to recycle regularly than women.

One problem potential recyclers face is there is no federal standard for what is collected and how. Services vary from one contractor to the next. Items deemed recyclable in one municipality may not be the next town over. As a general rule, bottles, cans, and newspapers are curbside-recyclable. Also as a general rule, prescription drugs, electronic devices, CFL bulbs and batteries are not – they shouldn’t go in the trash either - they require special handling.  But does the average consumer know this? We asked our online panelists who have access to recycling services how they believe their trash/recycling haulers would like them to handle certain items. And here’s what we learned:

  • Knowledge of recycling the Big-3 (glass bottles – aluminum cans – newspapers) is quite high. At least 80% of our panelists with access to recycling services know each of these should be recycled as opposed to trashed. And men and women are equally knowledgeable.
  • Word has spread that electronics do not belong in the trash. But our consumers are divided as to where they should go – 35% believe their contractor wants them in their recycling bin while just 46% believe electronics require special arrangements.
  • When we get to other items, things get a bit murky:
    1. Our panelists are as likely to believe that batteries can go out in the trash or recycling (45%) as believe batteries require special arrangements (41%). The rest aren’t sure.
    2. 19% aren’t sure what to do with compact fluorescent light bulbs.
    3. 22% believe that prescription drugs can be put out in the trash. 17% aren’t sure.
  • Meanwhile, some items that are traditionally “trashed” make consumers take pause – 26% of our consumers believe their hauler wants them to recycle linens and towels.

Focusing solely on those who say they recycle, women are more likely than men to know what goes where…

Recycling Market Research part2

Ladies, you may want to re-think having your gents handle the trash and recycling - or give them a quick lesson on what you've learned!

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Do Americans Recycle Enough? - PART I

Posted by on in Consumer Behavior

access to recycling utilityAccording to Economist.com, Americans aren’t doing a good job of recycling.  There is actually a shortage of materials from recycling facilities that could be used to produce new products. The author posits that there are a variety of reasons for this, including simple access: “a quarter of Americans lack access to proper bins for collecting recyclable material, and another quarter go without any curbside recycling at all.”  But I think it goes beyond access, and I surveyed our intrepid online panel of adult consumers to find out.


A little over a quarter (28%) of TRC’s panelists say they do not have residential recycling service. Increasing awareness and access for rental properties would certainly make a dent: renters are more likely to say they don’t have it (44%) than homeowners (19%).


But what if you are aware and have access?  Does that mean you’re recycling?  Not necessarily.  Only 75% of those who could be recycling are doing so on a regular basis (usually or always). There’s no difference between renters and homeowners with recycling access as far as how often they recycle. But there is one key difference between those who regularly do and those who don’t: gender. Women are far more likely to say that they recycle regularly (84%) than men (62%). I’m not sure why there is a gender disparity, but we’ll explore how knowledgeable men and women are about recycling in my next blog.

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My friend and I don’t share the same definition of what it means to be on-time. I don’t necessarily subscribe to the “early is on-time, on-time is late, late is unacceptable” theory, but I do try to arrive at or before an agreed upon time. She thinks there is wiggle room surrounding any appointment time – 5 or 10 minutes – and doesn’t seem concerned that I’ve been waiting for her to arrive. The good news is, if I’m running behind schedule, it doesn’t bother her that I arrive late. But if I’m going to be 5 to 10 minutes late, I’ll notify her. She would never think to do the same – because in her mind she’s on-time.

Perhaps I have too strict a definition of what it means to be on-time. Is 5 minutes considered late to everyone or just to me? We surveyed TRC’s online consumer panel to get an answer.

We used 5 minutes as our test case. If an appointment time is at 9:00 and actual arrival is 9:05, do you consider yourself on-time or late (or early)? To make things interesting, we asked about a variety of scenarios, since it’s possible that definitions may change based on the social situation.

If your boss calls an urgent meeting and you arrive 5 minutes past the start time, 2/3 of our participants consider that to be “late”.  When I saw that, at first I felt vindicated. But then I realized that if 2/3 are saying they’re late, that means 1/3 say it’s okay – 5 minutes is on-time or even early. Then I looked at the rest of the scenarios: 2/3 consider 5 minutes as “late” for babysitting or for a weekly religious service. If you show up 5 minutes after your reservation time at a restaurant, only 57% consider that to be late. And if you’re meeting a friend for casual dinner (no reservations), only 47% -- less than half of the adults we surveyed -- believe that 5 minutes off-schedule is actually “late”. What’s this world coming to?

being late infographics TRC

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