Welcome visitor you can log in or create an account

800.275.2827

Consumer Insights. Market Innovation.

blog-page

Consumer Behavior

advanced-market-research-methods-and-candyAt TRC, the most popular spot in the office is our snack shelf. It features an array of sugary, salty and carb heavy treats. The contents vary and are determined by one person (Ruth, who stocks the shelf) with influence from the rest of us (based on past usage and suggestions). Sometimes the shelf has exactly what you’re looking for. Other times, not so much. But what if instead of relying on Ruth’s powers of deduction we were to use research to figure out the optimal shelf configuration?  We’re researchers, after all. 
 
We would start out by using our Idea Mill™ product to generate ideas on which snacks people want to have. It uses incentive alignment and gamification to bring out the most creative ideas and provide direction on the favorites. It is likely that this will create too long a list of ideas (the candy shelf is only so large) and while we can toss out ideas that are not feasible, we believe it is best not to toss out ideas just because you personally don’t like them (I’m looking at you Mr. Goodbar). Far better to get more consumer input…this time to narrow the list. 
 
We could ask our folks to rate all the suggested snacks and then use that to figure out which ones should make the cut. Ratings might be good enough to eliminate some things (my guess is that despite what people claim, healthy snacks would bite the dust), but among popular snacks (like different types of pretzels) we are not likely to see clear differentiation.
 
A choice method like Max-Diff could help but if the list was long it would require a lot of work on the part of our employee respondents. A method like our proprietary Bracket™  would do the job in a faster and more engaging fashion while still finding clear winners and losers.  
 
Stocking the winners would therefore make the most sense…but would it please the most people?
Currently the shelf features five types of M&M’s (original, almond, caramel, dark and strawberry nut). If dark chocolate was the least preferred it might get cut. But what if those who like almond, caramel and strawberry nut also liked original, but those who like dark only liked it. For situations like this we can take the results of the Bracket™ (or Max-Diff) and use TURF  to find the combination that would please the most people.   
 
Of course, another factor is positioning. The shelf is only so large. M&M’s can be dispensed from any size canister (in fact Ruth has one that spins so that it can dispense three types) while Pretzels tend to come in large bins that take up a lot of room. In addition, not all of the snacks cost the same. In an effort to keep our expenses and waistline under control we follow a strict budget. Might I trade off having greater quantity of a lesser snack in exchange for an expensive favorite? 
 
For these kinds of questions a discrete choice conjoint is the answer. We can include a variety of candy types and constraints related to the room they take up as well as cost. Simulations can then optimize how to spend our candy budget.  
Despite our love of research and wide array of tools though, I think in this case they would be overkill (we have a very small population of around 40 employees). So I think we’ll stick with Ruth’s instincts. I never go wanting….
 
Hits: 72 0 Comments

Market-Research-Prioritization-email-violations

I work in a business that depends heavily on email. We use it to ask and answer questions, share work product, and engage our clients, vendors, co-workers and peers on a daily basis. When email goes down – and thankfully it doesn't happen that often – we feel anything from mildly annoyed to downright panic-stricken.

So business email is ubiquitous. But not everyone follows the same rules of engagement – which can make for some very frustrating exchanges.

We assembled a list of 21 "violations" we experienced (or committed) and set out to find out which ones are considered the most bothersome.

Research panelists who say they use email for business purposes were administered our Bracket™ prioritization exercise to determine which email scenario is the "most irritating".

...

Should Hotels Respond to Online Reviews?

Posted by on in Consumer Behavior

Online reviews pricing Market researchYou are planning to take a trip to the city of brotherly love to visit the world famous Philadelphia Flower Show, and would like to book a hotel near the Convention Center venue. If you’re like most people, you go online, perhaps to TripAdvisor or Expedia and look for a hotel. In a few clicks you find a list of hotels with star ratings, prices, amenities, distance to destination – everything you need to make a decision. Quickly you narrow your choice down to two hotels within walking distance of the Flower Show, and conveniently located near the historic Reading Terminal Market.

But how to choose between the two that seem so evenly matched? Perhaps you can take a look at some review comments that might provide more depth? There are hundreds of comments which is more than you have time for, but you quickly read a few on the first page. You are about to close the browser when you notice something. One of the hotels has responses to some of the negative comments. Hmmm…interesting. You decide to read the responses, and see some apologies, a few explanations and general earnestness. No such response for the other hotel, which now begins to seem colder and more distant. What do you do?

In effect, that’s the question Davide Proserpio and Georgios Zervas seek to answer in a recent article in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science. And it’s not hard to see why it’s an important question. Online reviews can have significant impact on a business, and unlike word of mouth they tend to stick around for years (just take a look at the dates on some reviews). Companies can’t do much to stop reviews (especially negative), and so they often try to coopt them by providing responses to selected reviews. It is a manual task, but the idea seems sound. By responding, perhaps they can take the sting out of negative reviews, appear contrite, promise to do better, or just thank the reviewer for the time they took to write the feedback – all with the objective of getting prospective customers to give them a fair chance. The question then is whether such efforts are useful or just more online clutter.

It turns out that’s not an easy question to answer, and as Proserpio and Zervas document in the article, there are several factors that first need to be controlled. But their basic approach is easy enough to understand – they examine whether TripAdvisor ratings for hotels tend to go up after management responds to online reviews. An immediate problem to overcome, ironically enough, is management response. That is, in reaction to bad reviews a hotel may actually make changes that then increases future ratings. That’s great for the hotel, but not so much for the researcher who is trying to study if the response to the online review had an impact, not whether the hotel is willing to make changes in response to the review. So, that’s an important factor that needs to be controlled. How to do that?

Enter Expedia. As it happens, hotels frequently respond to TripAdvisor reviews while they almost never do so on Expedia. So, they use Expedia as a control cell and compare the before-after difference in ratings on TripAdvisor and Expedia (the difference-in-difference approach). Hence they are able to tease out if the improvement in ratings was because of responding to reviews or real changes. Another check they use is to compare the ratings of guests who left a review shortly before a hotel began responding with those who did so shortly after the hotel began responding. Much of the article is actually devoted to several more clever and increasingly complex maneuvers they use to finally tease out just the impact of management responses. What do they find? 

...

market-research-without-biasThe Economist Magazine did an analysis of political book sales on Amazon to see if there were any patterns. Anyone who uses social media will not be surprised that readers tended to buy books from either the left or the right...not both. This follows an increasing pattern of people looking for validation rather than education and of course it adds to the growing divide in our country. A few books managed a good mix of readers from both sides, though often these were books where the author found fault with his or her own side (meaning a conservative trashing conservatives or a liberal trashing liberals).

I love this use of big data and hopefully it will lead some to seek out facts and opinions that differ from their own. These facts and opinions need not completely change an individual's own thinking, but at the very least they should give one a deeper understanding of the issue, including an understanding of what drives others' thinking.

In other words, hopefully the public will start thinking more like effective market researchers.

We could easily design research that validates the conventional wisdom of our clients.

• We can frame opinions by the way we ask questions or by the questions we asked before.
• We can omit ideas from a max-diff exercise simply because our "gut" tells us they are not viable.
• We can design a discrete choice study with features and levels that play to our client's strengths.
• We can focus exclusively on results that validate our hypothesis.

...

how-to-green-marketingDo people buy green products? Yes, of course. The real question for green marketers is whether they buy enough. In other words, are green sales in line with pro-green attitudes? Not really, as huge majorities of consumers show at least some green tendencies while purchases lag far behind. Why is that? Economics tells us that consumers buy based on value (trading off cost and benefits). Since eco-friendly products are seen as being more expensive, higher prices can lower the value of a green product enough to make a conventional alternative more attractive.

While the cost trade-off is clear, it is not the only one. The benefit side has at least two major components. One is the environmental benefit, which may or may not seem tangible enough to make a difference. For instance, a dozen eggs at Acme goes for less than a dollar, while some cage-free varieties can run north of $4 at Whole Foods. So, an environmentally conscious consumer has to make a trade-off at the time of purchase – is the product worth the additional cost? For items like food, the benefits may seem small enough, and far enough out, that many may decide the value proposition does not work for them. In other product categories (say, green laundry detergent), the benefits may seem both long term and impersonal, making the trade-off even harder.

The second major component is the effectiveness of the product in performing its basic function. If consumers perceive green products as inherently inferior (in terms of conventional attributes like performance), they are less likely to buy them. So a green laundry detergent (that uses less harsh chemicals) could be seen as more expensive and less effective in cleaning clothes, further dropping its overall value. (A complicating issue is that the lack of effectiveness itself could be a perceptual rather than real problem). Unless the company is able to offset these disadvantages, the product is unlikely to succeed.

A direct way to increase demand is to offer higher performance on a compensatory attribute. In the case of LED TVs, for example, newer technology consumes less power and provides better picture quality. (Paradoxically, this can sometimes lead to the Rebound Effect, whereby greener technologies encourage higher use, thus clawing back some of the benefits). But in reality, most products are not in a position where green attributes offer performance boosts.

And of course, as it is with every other market, there are segments in this market as well. Consumers who are highly committed (dark green) are willing to buy, as the value they place on the longer term environmental benefits is high enough. And, often they are affluent enough to afford the price. But a product looking for mainstream success cannot succeed only with dark green consumers (who rarely account for more than 20% of the market). Other shades of green will also need to buy. Short of government subsidies and mandates, green marketers have to find ways to balance out the components of the value proposition for the bulk of the market.

...

Want to know more?

Give us a few details so we can discuss possible solutions.

Please provide your Name.
Please provide a valid Email.
Please provide your Phone.
Please provide your Comments.
Enter code below : Enter code below :
Please Enter Correct Captcha code
Our Phone Number is 1-800-275-2827
 Find TRC on facebook  Follow us on twitter  Find TRC on LinkedIn

Our Clients