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Leaving the Best Ideas on the Drawing Board during Catalog Cover Testing

Catalog Cover TestingVery few clients will go to market with a new concept without some form of market research to test it first. Others will use some real world substitutes (such as A/B Mail tests) to accomplish the same end. No one would argue against the effectiveness of things like this...they provide a scientific basis for making the right decision. Why is it then that in early stage decision-making science is often replaced with their gut?

Consider this...an innovation department cooks up a dozen or more ideas for new or improved products and services. At this point they are nothing more than ideas with perhaps some crude mock-ups to go along with them. Doing full out concept testing would be costly for this number of ideas and a real world test is certainly not in the cards. Instead, a "team" which might include product managers, marketing folks, researchers and even some of the innovation people who came up with the concepts are brought together to wean the ideas down to a more manageable level.

The team carefully evaluates each concept, perhaps ranks them and provides their thinking on why they liked certain ones. These "independent' evaluations are tallied and the dozen concepts are reduced to two or three. These two or three are then developed further and put through a more rigorous and costly process - in-market testing. The concept or concepts that score best in this process are then launched to the entire market.

This process produces a result, but also some level of doubt. Perhaps the concept that the team thought was best scored badly in the more rigorous research or the winning concept just didn't perform as well as the team thought it would. Does anyone wonder if perhaps some of the ideas that the team weaned out might have performed even better than the "winners" they picked? What opportunities might have been lost if the best ideas were left on the drawing board?

The initial weaning process is susceptible to various forms of error including group think. The less rigorous process is used not because it is seen as best, but because the rigorous methods normally used are too costly to employ on a large list of items. Does that mean going with your gut is the only option?

Early stage research like this doesn't have to answer every question about the concept...in fact it only has to answer one - "Which concepts should we move forward with?" Tools like our Message Test Express™ or Idea Mill™ products are set up to do just that. They are rigorous, quantitative and use advanced analytical methods derived from conjoint to get at the answer. But because the focus is so clear and the survey can be standardized, results can be delivered quickly and inexpensively. They can easily be applied to messages, concepts, features, packages, naming, mail pieces or covers (magazine, catalog, brochure). Even a custom study that is focused on this one question can be done at a fraction of the cost of typical concept testing. Methods like Max-Diff or our proprietary Bracket™ are perfect for these sorts of questions.

As with any research, the key is to find the right tool for the objective.

President, TRC


Rich brings a passion for quantitative data and the use of choice to understand consumer behavior to his blog entries. His unique perspective has allowed him to muse on subjects as far afield as Dinosaurs and advanced technology with insight into what each can teach us about doing better research.  

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