Welcome visitor you can log in or create an account

800.275.2827

Consumer Insights. Market Innovation.

blog-page

TRC-is-GRIT-TOP-50-market-research

For the third time, we've been recognized by GRIT as one of the 50 most innovative market research firms in the world. I'm humbled by the endorsement that our clients and peers have given us. It is especially gratifying since we are smaller than most of these firms and don't have the budget that they do for promoting themselves. It got me to thinking about what it is about TRC that overcomes these disadvantages.

Obviously, I could point to innovations we've developed like Bracket™ (a better way of ranking lists of items), Smart Incentives™ (using gamification to drive respondent engagement), advances in conjoint (too long to list here) and our agile suite (rigorous quantitative economical and fast solutions). I know the amount of time we put into developing these and the value they have delivered, but what I hear from clients is that this is only part of what makes TRC special.

Clients consistently tell us that they appreciate working with senior researchers who seek to find the solutions not to a research problem, but to a business problem. When their problem demands a solution such as the ones above, they value it, but they know that our goal is not to dazzle them with the latest tools we have come up with, but rather to do so by getting them the answers they need.

For example, in the last year we have had two clients in very different industries (CPG, Healthcare) come to us with very different problems (sorry I can't share that). To solve both of them we used an old technique (Multi-Dimensional Scaling or MDS). This tool was not designed to solve the problems they had, but by breaking the problem down it was clear to us that it was the right tool to do so. In both cases this solved their business challenge and in one it allowed us to do so at a fraction of the anticipated budget.

...

Conjoint-rational-irrational

I’m a big fan of Russ Roberts’ podcast Econtalk. While technically about economics he covers a variety of subjects with his guests and it always gives me something to think about. Recently he welcomed Mary Hirschfeld of Villanova University to talk about her book “Aquinas and the Market”. She challenges some of the fundamentals of modern Economics.

Economists typically see “rational” behavior as one in which a person attempts to maximize their wealth. This leads to the behavioral economic principles that see choices that don’t maximize wealth as “irrational”. For example, an unemployed baseball fan catches a multi-millionaire player’s 500th home run ball. The baseball is likely worth tens of thousands of dollars so if the fan gives it back to the player that is deemed “irrational”.

Dr. Hirschfeld might see this differently. She feels that economics itself is irrational…it fails to recognize the value of non-monetary aspects of a transaction. The fan might think the player actually deserves the ball more than the fan and thus puts value in doing the right thing…returning the ball to its rightful owner.

She repeatedly makes the point that wealth is a means to an end and that focusing on it will not maximize your value as a human being. The rational human thinks about what they really need materially, spiritually and emotionally. They can then make the trade-offs necessary to maximize their overall well-being. They might decide that teaching math in a disadvantaged area, even though they will make less, is a better fit for them than say taking a job on Wall Street.

...

Can AI Help in Finding Optimal Pricing?

Posted by on in Pricing Research

Facial-Recognition-Technology pricing-research

Technology is simply brilliant! If I didn’t already embrace that fact, “60 Minutes” reinforced that upon me with their article about Kai-Fu Lee, the “Oracle of Artificial Intelligence” recently.

A company of Mr. Lee’s, Face ++, has deep-learning facial response programs that can tell educators which students are engaged, bored or confused during classroom lectures. Teachers can see at what point during lecture these responses happened, and can follow up with the individuals.

And, modern kitchens can re-order supplies for you, such as your fridge noting the milk or eggs are empty, or when you have used any of the food you purchased. The fridge can automatically contact your supplier and new food arrive before you even knew it was needed.

But, the practical success of technology has its limitations. The teachers can be alerted as to which students were excited/confused by the lecture, but the software does not know “why” it happened, and doesn’t know anything more than the facial response identified. “60 Minutes” notes that “a typical AI system can do one thing well, but can’t adapt what it knows to any other task.”

...

Girl-Scout-cookies-TURF-Market-Research-analysis

Every winter one of my co-workers at TRC reminds us that Girl Scout Cookie Season is upon us. GSCS (my abbreviation) is a time to call attention to, celebrate and support the agency dedicated to building “girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.”  All well and good, but when it comes down to it, I just want the cookies.

Their best sellers year after year – Thin Mints, Peanut Butter Patties/Tagalogs and Carael Delites/Samoas – contain chocolate. But I don’t eat chocolate (doctor’s orders). Which means every year I hold my breath until I learn whether my favorite GSC – the Lemonade – is still on the list. And thankfully, it is being offered once again in 2019. I ordered 5 boxes from my co-worker’s daughter.

My no-chocolate policy makes me a “niche” consumer of not only GSCs but of snacks and candies in general. When Hershey came out with Hershey Gold in 2017 (essentially a chocolate bar without the chocolate), I thought they had developed it just for me! I hadn’t eaten a candy bar in years until I tried that one. Now it’s my go-to when I need a little something sweet.

But the problem with niche markets is they are small by definition. I worry that with a limited market, eventually Lemonades and Hershey Gold will be dropped in favor of more popular products.

...

customer-lifetime-value-pricing-research

I was reading Russell Perkins blog (Russell and his firm Infocommerce group help clients develop product strategy and new product development) about the use of Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) in Relationship Scoring. He takes note of a new trend to apply CLV across all customer touchpoints.


As researchers the concept of CLV is something we are quite familiar with. It seeks to take into account everything known about a customer (these might include factors ranging from past purchase and payment behavior to things like credit score, income or level of education) in order to determine the value that customer is likely to bring over their lifetime.


Relationship scoring then uses this to determine how the customer should be treated. High value customers are given opportunities from better customer service to special offers. Is this idea really all that new?  


In many respects it is not. Long before advanced algorithms firms recognized that some customers were more valuable than others. For example a good butcher knew how important each customer was and provided perks to them (like setting aside the best cuts of meat).

...

Want to know more?

Give us a few details so we can discuss possible solutions.

Please provide your Name.
Please provide a valid Email.
Please provide your Phone.
Please provide your Comments.
Enter code below : Enter code below :
Please Enter Correct Captcha code
Our Phone Number is 1-800-275-2827
 Find TRC on facebook  Follow us on twitter  Find TRC on LinkedIn

Our Clients