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election bias new product researchSo I certainly do not follow politics closely, even during a presidential election year, which I guess could also be read as I don’t know very much about politics. But that small disclaimer aside, watching the news coverage of the recently passed Iowa Caucuses and upcoming New Hampshire primary, something struck me as peculiar in this process. These events happen in succession, not simultaneously. So first is the Iowa Caucus, then the New Hampshire primary, followed by the Nevada and South Carolina primaries, and so on with the other states.  And after each event is held the results are (almost) immediately known. So the folks in New Hampshire know the outcome from Iowa. The folks in Nevada and South Carolina know the outcomes from Iowa and New Hampshire. 

Doesn’t this lead to inherent and obvious bias? That’s the market researcher side talking. In implementing questionnaires we wouldn’t typically make known the results from previous respondents to those taking the survey later. This would surely have some influence on their answers that we wouldn’t want. We need a clean, pure read (as best as we can with surveys) as to consumer opinions and attitudes. Any deviation from this would surely compromise our data. 

But then again, is this always the case? Could there be situations in which some purposely predisposed informational bias is beneficial? I say yes! Granted one needs to be cautious and thoughtful when exposing respondents to prior information, but sometimes in order to get the specific type of response we want, a little bias is helpful. If asking about a particular product or product function, we may provide an example or guide so they can fully understand the product. E.g. 10 GB of storage is good for X number of movies and X number of songs. 

But circling back to the notion of letting respondents see the answers from previous respondents, even within the same survey, this could be quite helpful in priming folks to start thinking creatively. If we wish to gather creative ideas from consumers, it’s easy enough to ask them outright to jot something down. But it’s difficult to come up with new and creative ideas on the fly without much help. And responses we get from such tasks validate that point as many are nonsense, or short dull answers. So instead, we could show a respondent several ideas that have come up previously, either internally or from previous respondents, to jumpstart the thinking process and either edit/add onto an existing idea, or be stimulated enough to come up with their own unique idea. And truth is, it works! We at TRC implement this exact new product research technique with great success in our Idea Mill™ solution, and end up with many creative and unique ideas that our client companies use to move forward.

So while the presidential process strikes me as odd since any votes cast in other states following the Iowa Caucus may be inherently biased, there are opportunities where this sort of predisposition to information can work in our favor.

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Future new product researchDecember and January are full of articles that tell us what to expect in the New Year. There is certainly nothing wrong with thinking about the future (far from it), but it is important that we do so with a few things in mind. Predications are easy to make, but hard to get right, at least consistently.


First, to some extent we all suffer from the “past results predict the future” model. We do so because quite often they do, but there is no way to know when they no longer will. As such, be wary of predictions that say something like “last year neuro research was used by 5% of fortune 500 companies…web panels hit the 5% mark and then exploded to more than 50% within three years.” It might be right to assume the two will have similar outcomes, or it might be that the two situations (both in terms of the technique and in terms of the market at the time) are quite different.


Second, we all bring a bias to our thinking. We have made business decisions based on where we think the market is going and so it is only natural that our predictions might line up with that. At TRC we’ve invested in agile products to aid in the early stage product development process. I did so because I believe the market is looking for rigorous, fast and inexpensive ways to solve problems like ideation, prioritization and concept evaluation. Quite naturally if I’m asked to predict the future I’ll tend to see these as having great potential.


Third, some people will be completely self-serving in their predictions. So, for example, we do a tremendous amount of discrete choice conjoint work. I certainly would like to think that this area will grow in the next year so I might be tempted to make the prediction in the hopes that readers will suddenly start thinking about doing a conjoint study.   


Fourth, an expert isn’t always right. Hearing predictions is useful, but ultimately you have to consider the reasoning behind them, seek out your own sources of information and consider things that you already know. Just because someone has a prediction published, doesn’t mean they know the future any better than you do. 

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wawa app market research surveyAbout a decade ago, if someone would have mentioned the words "mobile app", anyone would have looked at them with a very puzzled expression. Nowadays, we hear about these apps everywhere. There are commercials for them on television, ads in magazines, billboard posts, etc. It's truly amazing to see how advanced technology has become and what can be accomplished by using it.

In this technology-based era, the smartphone is becoming increasingly popular among a wide variety of ages. In my opinion, the biggest perk of smartphones is that we almost always have access to the Internet. Being that the Internet is one of the most efficient tools that retailers and businesses use to create, retain, and obtain business, why wouldn't they capitalize on the popularity and functionality of smartphones and use it to their advantage to do even more creating, obtaining and refining of their business? One of the best ways for a company to remain competitive in this smartphone era is to create a mobile app specific to the company.

Take Wawa for example. For those who are not on the East coast and may be unfamiliar with Wawa, it is a wonderful place that offers gasoline, freshly prepared foods, snacks, coffee and more. Okay, yes, ultimately it's a convenience store/gas station. However, to many of us on the East coast, it's much more. Anyway, if you download the Wawa app, you can link it up with your credit card or a Wawa gift card, which means you don't even have to bring your wallet into the store. The app includes a rewards system, in which you receive points for your purchases, which can be used to receive a free coffee or tea, or something of similar value. While Wawa offers many benefits to its customers through its mobile app, such as locating a nearby Wawa, checking gasoline prices or having easy access to nutrition info, it also gives app users the chance to provide feedback by means of an open-end suggestion form. It would benefit the company to implement a survey within the app instead of an open-end feedback form to gain insights about customers' transactions, experiences, and their overall opinions.

Fielding surveys within mobile apps provides a quick and easy way to reach customers and gain useful feedback. So, how do you get app users to actually participate in the survey? Simple. When the app is first opened or closed, add a pop-up message with a link to the survey that encourages the user to take the survey. Also, go ahead and add the survey as an item on the app's navigation menu. While it's not ideal to conduct surveys on mobile devices that contain something as intricate as conjoint analysis, companies can still create a simple survey that can be used to gain valuable insights about current products, potential products, customer satisfaction and an abundance of other consumer-related topics.

In order to create the best experience for the app user and get the most out of the data that is collected, companies should consider these five tips when developing a mobile survey:

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whats important homebuying market researchThe weather is starting to warm up and more of us are venturing outside, myself included. Walking my dog around the neighborhood I’ve noticed a number of for-sale signs and it reminds me of my own recent home buying experience. It was exciting and at the same time stressful. Once I made the decision to buy I started watching all the home buying shows and attending open houses to figure out my list of must-haves and nice to haves. I wondered how my list stacked up against others who went through or are going through the home buying process.

Using our online panel of consumers, I employed TRC’s proprietary Bracket™ exercise to find out what homebuyers find most important when considering buying a home. Bracket™ is a tournament-based analytic approach to understanding priorities. For each participant, Bracket™ randomly assigns the items being evaluated into pairs. Participants choose the winning item from each pair; that item moves on to the next round. Rounds continue until there is one “winner” per participant. Bracket™ uses this information to prioritize the remaining items, and calculate the relative distance between them.

I created a list of 13 things to consider. I didn’t include standard house stats: # of bedrooms, # of baths, etc. as I tested those separately using a conjoint analysis (my next blog will dive into what I did there).

Proximity to work

Proximity to family

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Catalog Cover TestingVery few clients will go to market with a new concept without some form of market research to test it first. Others will use some real world substitutes (such as A/B Mail tests) to accomplish the same end. No one would argue against the effectiveness of things like this...they provide a scientific basis for making the right decision. Why is it then that in early stage decision-making science is often replaced with their gut?

Consider this...an innovation department cooks up a dozen or more ideas for new or improved products and services. At this point they are nothing more than ideas with perhaps some crude mock-ups to go along with them. Doing full out concept testing would be costly for this number of ideas and a real world test is certainly not in the cards. Instead, a "team" which might include product managers, marketing folks, researchers and even some of the innovation people who came up with the concepts are brought together to wean the ideas down to a more manageable level.

The team carefully evaluates each concept, perhaps ranks them and provides their thinking on why they liked certain ones. These "independent' evaluations are tallied and the dozen concepts are reduced to two or three. These two or three are then developed further and put through a more rigorous and costly process - in-market testing. The concept or concepts that score best in this process are then launched to the entire market.

This process produces a result, but also some level of doubt. Perhaps the concept that the team thought was best scored badly in the more rigorous research or the winning concept just didn't perform as well as the team thought it would. Does anyone wonder if perhaps some of the ideas that the team weaned out might have performed even better than the "winners" they picked? What opportunities might have been lost if the best ideas were left on the drawing board?

The initial weaning process is susceptible to various forms of error including group think. The less rigorous process is used not because it is seen as best, but because the rigorous methods normally used are too costly to employ on a large list of items. Does that mean going with your gut is the only option?

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